Seamus Heaney - Aisling - Poetry Analysis

Aisling

Aisling Crime and punishment: a different genre, a classical time; the ‘he’ and the ‘her’ from classical mythology feed myth and allegory. Actaeon’s attempts to possess Artemis (He courted her) are less physical than Ralegh’s towards the maid of Ireland but the arch flattery of his intentions, his decadent sweet art is judged equally unworthy. The peeping-Tom is given away by the wind’s vowel/ Blowing through the hazels that whispers his question for him: ‘Are you Diana . . . ?’ But was he Actaeon or is he a figure of allegory? Heaney warns all abusers, whether they rape the aisling’s maid of nationality or lust after a classical goddess of Beauty, that whatever their remorse, a painful fate will be theirs. Actaeon’s regret was high lament, his punishment irrevocable: The stag’s exhausted belling. 2 quatrains: a stage-set followed by 2 questions; first verse enjambed; no rhyme scheme; sound effects: […read more….]